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Long Term Bargain eBooks
Author: Genre: (, , ) Length: Novella

Bargain on 26th - 30th Oct 18
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This book contains 250 anecdotes, including these:
1) In 1969, the town of Picoaza, Ecuador, elected as its mayor a foot powder named Pulvapies. This is what happened. Taking advantage of an upcoming election, the Pulvapies foot powder company rolled out an advertising campaign that made it seem as if their foot powder was a real person who was really running for mayor. The ads proclaimed in big letters: VOTE FOR PULVAPIES. Of course, a foot powder cannot become mayor, so the election was voided, a new election was held, and a real human being was elected mayor. However, the new mayor made himself unpopular, and these signs appeared in the town of Picoaza: “BRING BACK PULVAPIES!” and “PULVAPIES, THE BEST MAYOR WE EVER HAD!”
2) Texas State Comptroller Bob Bullock knew everyone, good and bad, in politics. At a political shindig where all kinds were invited, he was standing with Ann Richards and Molly Ivins and with Charles Miles, who was in charge of Mr. Bullock’s personnel department. A racist judge greeted Mr. Bullock, met Ms. Ivins, and then was introduced to Mr. Miles, who is African-American. The racist judge was not happy, but he shook Mr. Miles’ hand — barely. Then the racist judge asked about Ms. Richards, “And who is this lovely lady?” Ms. Richards, knowing the judge was racist, grinned widely and replied, “I am Mrs. Miles.” (Actually, her husband was David Richards, but they divorced.)
3) Lithuanians hated being under Soviet domination, and this hatred appeared in their underground humor. In the town square of Kaunas was a statue of Vladimir Lenin with one hand stretched out to the people, and the other hand behind his back. To illustrate life under the Communists, Lithuanians used to place objects in Lenin’s hands. In the hand behind Lenin’s back was placed a piece of bread, and in the hand stretched out to the people was placed a piece of doggy doo-doo. Also, Lithuanians used to pretend the statue was a scarecrow. Each spring, plants would appear around the statue; Lithuanians had secretly planted the plants.

Bargain on 26th - 30th Oct 18
View on Amazon.co.uk

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