Banning Books

Discussion in 'Tea Room (Book Chat)' started by jessica, 11 Oct 2016.

  1. jessica

    jessica Member

    It has just been another banned books week, so everyone's talking about Huckleberry Finn and Judy Blume :confused: being banned in the US. The UK tends to ban adult books, like Spycatcher and Lady Chatterly's Lover, but it always seems to be old books. The Telegraph has a top 20 and its odd because different countries focus on banning different types of books, but they're all old examples and I thought we'd kind of moved on.

    This morning I got this on Medium, about a book about a transgender teen being banned :( . I am Jazz and looked it up. There's some details here(why can't I post links? o_O), but if 9 of the ten most challenged books are about diversity, have we really moved on from the days of Huck Finn?

    What do you think about book banning?
     
  2. Kindler

    Kindler Member

    What. This link from the Telegraph.

    I'm guessing you missed the nice link icon at the top :p
     
  3. jessica

    jessica Member

    I was trying BBCode. I forgot about the button...:(
     
  4. Context

    Context New Member

    I think it's a redundant act in 2017. After reading the original post here, I did a quick search and within 2 minutes I had the PDF of Huck Finn on my computer. All 303 pages.
    http://contentserver.adobe.com/store/books/HuckFinn.pdf It's in the tab to the right of this one. If I had the time and wherewithal, I would print it out and send it to a library in a municipality that banned the book. It would be a counter-statement to their original one for the purpose of proving a point: You cannot ban books in 2017. Technology won't let you.

    Book banning is a political statement that serves no practical purpose other than telling the world what a bunch of boneheads the people are who are "banning" a book.
     
  5. Meryl

    Meryl New Member

    I totally agree that trying to ban books in this age is a waste of time. Technology has gotten to a point where you just can't take anything back anymore as long as it's already out there.
     
  6. HattieMoon

    HattieMoon New Member

    Banning this book may be an over-zealous nod to political correctness but the terms used in the book reflect the times it was written in. I would rather the people who called for or support the ban focused on how prevalent, albeit in more varied forms, the issues of oppression and slavery still are.
     
  7. Kindler

    Kindler Member

    I think the problem is that everyone looks at an older book with a very modern context, which is completely different to the author of the time.

    What always struck me as a better way of handling them would be to add a foreward explaining the story and its context. Give some reason as to why this book needs you to think about it instead of just blithely accepting its message.
     
    Quiet Sun likes this.
  8. Quiet Sun

    Quiet Sun New Member

    They should do that with the Bible so people quit taking passages out of context for the purpose of serving their own region-specific agenda's. It is a book, after all.
     
  9. Terry

    Terry Member

    Yeah and written with people's agendas, thoughts and understanding behind it.

    Are there any books that should be banned though? Not necessarily because people don't like what it may say, but what if it incites hatred or crimes?
     

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