Special

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Special

Last Free Dates: 30th Jan 19 to 31st Jan 19
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...A wonderful story to inspire children with disabilities...

Kitty Wampus was born missing her right rear leg and has spent her early years trying to overcome the difficulties she faces. Now it is time for her to start school and face her fears of not being accepted. At first most of the other kittens don’t know how to accept her, but she makes a few friends. With their help she attends the football game, but when the crowd rushes to the stands she is knocked down. Despite her walker being damaged, she is still determined to make it to the dance that evening, she just doesn’t know how, or if she will be accepted.

This is a wonderful little story, told using kittens just but as valid for any children wondering if they can find acceptance and also for adults to understand and explain the situation as well. The heart-warming message is that Kitty Wampus is a child first and disabled second, that she still has the same thoughts and feelings as any other and this comes through clearly in the story. The story writing is clear and concise and while it only covers a short period of time, says exactly what it needs to do. The plot covers in a few simple events the ups and down, fears and worries of people in that situation, but also the fears of those around in how they should act and feel towards others. This helps to raise the book from a one-sided viewpoint to something more rounded for all to enjoy and understand.

The only downside is that the ending is wrapped up a little neatly, but for a tale to inspire and provide hope to children, I think this can be forgiven.

Rating: 5
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